February 28, 2018

Pine Needles to Host in 2022

Scene of Historic Performances, Pine Needles to Host in 2022
February 27, 2018 | Liberty Corner, N.J. By Julia Pine, USGA


2018 U.S. Women’s Open: Tickets    Sorenstam, Webb, Kerr Talk Pine Needles

Pine Needles Lodge & Golf Club in Southern Pines, N.C., will be the host site for the 77th U.S. Women’s Open in 2022. The championship, considered the ultimate test in women’s golf, will be held June 2–5.

The 2022 U.S. Women’s Open will be the seventh USGA championship and record fourth U.S. Women’s Open contested at Pine Needles, which is also set to host the 2nd U.S. Senior Women’s Open in 2019. The USGA was last at Pine Needles for the 2007 U.S. Women’s Open, when Cristie Kerr won the first of her two majors with a two-stroke victory over Lorena Ochoa and Angela Park.


“We are thrilled to bring another U.S. Women’s Open to one of the most respected courses in the United States,” said Stuart Francis, USGA Championship Committee chairman. “Three great USGA champions have conquered the ultimate test in women’s golf at Pine Needles, and we look forward to adding the 77th U.S. Women’s Open champion to that illustrious list.”

In addition to Kerr’s victory in 2007, Pine Needles also played host to the 2001 U.S. Women’s Open, won by Karrie Webb, and the 1996 U.S. Women’s Open, won by Annika Sorenstam.


“Pine Needles is, if not my favorite U.S. Women’s Open venue, it’s in the top three,” said Webb, whose 2001 victory was her second straight Women’s Open title. “Pine Needles [in 1996] was my very first U.S. Open I ever played in, and then when we went back in 2001, I was so excited to be there as a defending champion. Obviously, it was a special week where I played fantastic golf at a tremendous golf course. I’ll always have special memories of Pine Needles.”


Designed by Donald Ross and opened in 1928, Pine Needles was renovated in 2004 by John Fought, who oversaw the restoration of greens and bunkers to their original forms with the aid of vintage aerial photos. In the summer of 2016, Kyle Franz was brought in to assist with a green rebuilding and bunker restoration project that aimed to maximize hole locations. The club, which was owned by women’s golf advocate, renowned instructor and LPGA Tour charter member Peggy Kirk Bell from 1953 until her death in 2016, also hosted the 1989 U.S. Girls’ Junior and 1991 U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur championships.

“To host the most prestigious event in women’s golf for the fourth time speaks to our longstanding relationship with the USGA, and we’re honored they accepted our invitation to host the Women’s Open in 2022,” said Kelly Miller, president and CEO of Pine Needles. “The Donald Ross-designed course has already crowned three memorable Women’s Open champions, and we’re confident it will again be a welcoming yet challenging host for the world’s best players. I can only imagine how happy Mrs. Bell would have been to host another Women’s Open.”

Bell is largely credited with being the driving force behind Pine Needles hosting its first three U.S. Women’s Opens.

This will be the 34th USGA championship contested in North Carolina, which most recently hosted the 2017 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball Championship at Pinehurst Resort & Country Club, in the Village of Pinehurst. Upcoming USGA championships in the Tar Heel State include the 2018 U.S. Mid-Amateur at Charlotte Country Club, the 2019 U.S. Senior Women’s Open, the 2019 U.S. Amateur at Pinehurst and the 2019 U.S. Senior Amateur at Old Chatham Golf Club. Pinehurst No. 2 will also host the 2024 U.S. Open.

Upcoming U.S. Women’s Open Championships will be contested May 31-June 3, 2018, at Shoal Creek (Ala.); May 30-June 2, 2019, at the Country Club of Charleston (S.C.); June 4-7, 2020, at Champions Golf Club in Houston, Texas; June 3-6, 2021, at The Olympic Club in San Francisco, Calif.; and June 1-4, 2023, at Pebble Beach (Calif.) Golf Links in Pebble Beach.

Julia Pine is the manager of championship communications for the USGA. Email her at jpine@usga.org.

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January 30, 2018

Pinehurst to host 2019 US Amateur

“We are pleased to welcome the USGA’s oldest championship to Pinehurst once again in 2019,” Pinehurst owner Robert Dedman said in a statement. “As long as there has been golf at Pinehurst, we have celebrated the contributions amateurs have made to the game. To serve as the site of the U.S. Amateur will be an especially proud moment for Pinehurst, and it reflects the passion for amateur golf we share with the USGA.”

This is the second USGA event on the schedule for Pinehurst, which will host the U.S. Amateur Four-Ball in 2017, the third edition of that new tournament.

With the long-rumored U.S. Amateur officially headed to Pinehurst, attention now turns to the return of the U.S. Open. In June, outgoing Pinehurst president Don Padgett II said he expected it wouldn’t be long.

“Do we know exactly which year? No,” Padgett said. “But they’re coming back, and we’ll probably host an Amateur before we host an Open.”

The USGA has awarded Opens through 2021, with The Country Club in Brookline, Mass., expected to host in 2022 and Los Angeles Country Club in 2023.

Also on the Sandhills golf radar: The Women’s Open could return to Pine Needles Lodge and Golf Club for a fourth time at some point in that rough time frame, potentially as early as 2020.

DeCock: @LukeDeCock or 919-829-8947


Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/sports/golf/article20794515.html#storylink=cpy
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2018, 2019 U.S. Senior Women’s Open Sites Unveiled

February 5, 2016
FAR HILLS, N.J.

The United States Golf Association today announced Chicago Golf Club, in Wheaton, Ill., and Pine Needles Lodge & Golf Club, in Southern Pines, N.C., as the host sites of the inaugural 2018 U.S. Senior Women’s Open Championship and 2019 U.S. Senior Women’s Open Championship, respectively.

“The USGA is proud to realize its vision of hosting national championships for players of all age demographics, and we are thrilled that the first two editions of the U.S. Senior Women’s Open will be contested at two of the most respected courses in the United States,” said USGA President Thomas J. O’Toole Jr., who announced the establishment of the U.S. Senior Women’s Open in February 2015. “We hope this championship will inspire generations of female golfers to continue competing at the highest level long into their careers.”

The championship will be open to professional females, and amateur females with a Handicap Index® not exceeding 7.4, who have reached their 50th birthday as of the first day of the championship. The field will include 120 players, who will earn entry into the championship via sectional qualifying at sites nationwide or through an exemption category, the details of which will be announced at a later date.

The format will mirror that of the U.S. Open, U.S. Women’s Open and U.S. Senior Open championships: a walking-only, 72-hole stroke play competition over four consecutive days with a 36-hole cut to the top 60 players, including ties. Prize money will be announced at a later date.

The first U.S. Senior Women’s Open will be contested July 12-15, 2018 at Chicago Golf Club, one of the five founding clubs of the USGA and the oldest golf club in the U.S. in continuous use at the same location. The club was founded in 1893 by Charles Blair Macdonald, who won the inaugural U.S. Amateur in 1895. The original 18-hole course was renovated in 1923 by Seth Raynor and remains largely unchanged today.

This will be Chicago Golf Club’s 12th USGA championship. The club hosted its first two USGA championships in 1897 – the U.S. Open, won by Joe Lloyd, and the U.S. Amateur, won by H.J. Whigham. It also hosted the 1900 U.S. Open, won by Harry Vardon, a six-time winner of the Open Championship, conducted by The R&A, and the 1911 U.S. Open, won by 19-year-old John J. McDermott, who survived a three-man playoff to become the championship’s first American winner. Additional USGA championships contested at the club include: the U.S. Amateur (1905, 1909 and 1912), U.S. Women’s Amateur (1903), U.S. Senior Amateur (1979), and two Walker Cup Matches, both won by the USA Team (1928 and 2005). 

“As a founding member of the USGA, Chicago Golf Club is honored to support the USGA’s newest championship by hosting the inaugural U.S. Senior Women’s Open,” said Brad Kinsey, president of Chicago Golf Club. “We look forward to making this, our 12th USGA championship, an exceptional event for players and spectators alike.”

The 2018 U.S. Senior Women’s Open, the 61st USGA championship to be contested in Illinois, will be the state’s first Open championship since the 2003 U.S. Open, won by Jim Furyk at Olympia Fields Country Club. The 2015 U.S. Amateur, won by Bryson DeChambeau and also played at Olympia Fields, was the most recent USGA championship played in Illinois.

Pine Needles will host the 2019 U.S. Senior Women’s Open from May 16-19. Designed by Donald Ross and opened in 1928, the course was most recently renovated in 2004 by John Fought, who oversaw the restoration of greens and bunkers to their original forms with the aid of vintage aerial photos.

This will be the sixth USGA championship contested at Pine Needles and the first since the 2007 U.S. Women’s Open, won by Cristie Kerr. The club, owned by women’s golf advocate, instructor and former LPGA Tour player Peggy Kirk Bell, also hosted the 1996 and 2001 U.S. Women’s Opens, won by Annika Sorenstam and Karrie Webb, respectively. Additionally, the 1989 U.S. Girls’ Junior and 1991 U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur championships were contested at Pine Needles.

“On behalf of the Bell family and our entire community, Pine Needles is thrilled the USGA has accepted our invitation to host the 2019 U.S. Senior Women’s Open Championship,” said Kelly Miller, president of Pine Needles. “Having hosted three previous U.S. Women’s Opens, we look forward to seeing some familiar faces and welcoming all competitors to this new USGA championship. I’m confident our Donald Ross-designed course will identify another great champion.”

This will be the 32nd USGA championship contested in North Carolina, which most recently hosted the historic back-to-back 2014 U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open championships at Pinehurst Resort & Country Club, in the Village of Pinehurst. Upcoming USGA championships in the Tar Heel State include the 2017 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball and the 2019 U.S. Amateur, both at Pinehurst, and the 2018 U.S. Mid-Amateur at Charlotte Country Club.

 
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USGA makes it official: Pinehurst to host 2024 U.S. Open

“It’s a day to celebrate,” Pinehurst resort president Tom Pashley said Wednesday. “It’s great honor to earn the respect and trust of the U.S. Golf Association. Their willingness to return in 2024 again validates No. 2 as a championship test.

“It’s very important to continue to host a U.S. Open. It’s something that continues to make Pinehurst relevant to each new generation.”

Pashley said there had been no discussions with the USGA about hosting the 2024 U.S. Women’s Open in another Open doubleheader.

In the 1999 Open, the late Payne Stewart won with a par putt on the final hole, edging Phil Mickelson and striking a victory pose for the ages.


Pinehurst quickly was awarded the 2005 U.S. Open, won by Michael Campbell of New Zealand in a last-day duel with Tiger Woods. Martin Kaymer of Germany was a runaway winner in the U.S. Open last year, and Michelle Wie scored her breakthrough victory in a major championship by winning the U.S. Women’s Open seven days later.

“The thrill of hosting an Open never goes away,” Pashley said. “There are distinct memories from each Open. I remember last year feeling so proud of having so many people at Pinehurst, so many talking about Pinehurst. We’re in it and around it every day, but when the world sees it, it’s invigorating.

“Each Open carves out its own identity, its own memories. It should be that way in 2024.”

Pinehurst officials were expecting the USGA to break the news on the 2024 Open with its announcement this week. But the Pinehurst Village Council voted last week to approve a licensing agreement with the USGA for the 2024 championship. The agreement will include a payment of $350,000 by the USGA to the council.

“We are absolutely pleased to partner again with the USGA,” Pinehurst mayor Nancy Fiorillo said last week.

The USGA on Wednesday announced the sites for three U.S. Opens: The Country Club in Brookline, Mass. (2022, Los Angeles Country Club (2023) and Pinehurst. The 2024 Open will be played June 13-16.

“Pinehurst has elevated itself to one of the great and historic places in golf in this country,” USGA president Thomas O’Toole said in a statement. “Some say it’s our St. Andrews — it’s certainly something special, and that’s why we’re going back there for the 2024 U.S. Open.”

Having the 2014 Opens in back-to-back weeks was an economic boon. There was $140 million in visitor spending, with an economic impact of more than $238 million over a 26-county region.

Pashley didn’t completely rule out a U.S. Open-U.S. Women’s Open repeat in 2024. He noted the USGA typically makes an announcement on a U.S. Women’s Open site about two years after its U.S. Open selection, but added, “We’ve had no conversations at this point.”

Pinehurst will host a pair of USGA events before the 2024 Open. The U.S. Amateur Four-Ball Championship will be played in 2017 and the U.S. Amateur will return in 2019.

Pinehurst No. 2, the Donald Ross masterpiece, underwent an extensive renovation before the 2014 Opens. The golf design team of Ben Crenshaw and Bill Coore narrowed fairways and added more natural areas and native grasses to give No. 2 a more rustic look.

The bent-grass greens on No. 2 then were replaced by Champion bermuda grass soon after the championships.

“Pinehurst has elevated itself to one of the great and historic places in golf in this country,” USGA president Thomas O’Toole said in a statement. “Some say it’s our St. Andrews — it’s certainly something special, and that’s why we’re going back there for the 2024 U.S. Open.”

Pressed to pick an early-line favorite for the 2024 U.S. Open, Pashley said Mickelson and Woods should have aged out but noted Jordan Spieth, this year’s U.S. Open champ, will be just 30.

“In theory he should be in his prime, and there’s no telling how many Opens he may have won by then,” Pashley said.


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/sports/other-sports/article28255210.html#storylink=cpy
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U.S. Open Sites Revealed for 2022, 2023 and 2024

 

July 22, 2015
FAR HILLS, N.J.
By USGA

Three outstanding venues in three distinct regions of the U.S. were part of a landmark announcement today, as the USGA awarded the 2022, 2023 and 2024 U.S. Open Championships to The Country Club in Brookline, Mass., Los Angeles (Calif.) Country Club and Pinehurst Resort & Country Club in the Village of Pinehurst, N.C., respectively. 

“We are elated to host our national championship at these three historic venues,” said Thomas J. O’Toole Jr., president of the USGA. “Each one is located in an area where golf and sports are celebrated, and we have already felt tremendous community support. We look forward to the test of golf that each of these classic designs will present to the world’s best players.”

The 2022 U.S. Open, to be held June 16-19, will be the fourth U.S. Open at The Country Club, which most recently hosted the 2013 U.S. Amateur, won by Matthew Fitzpatrick, of England.

“We are thrilled to bring the 122nd U.S. Open Championship to such a storied golf course and a great club, one of the five clubs that founded the USGA in 1894,” said O’Toole. “Arguably the most significant event in American golf happened there in 1913, when the young local amateur Francis Ouimet defeated the top pros of the day, Harry Vardon and Ted Ray, in the first U.S. Open played at The Country Club.”

The 2022 U.S. Open will be the 17th USGA championship hosted by The Country Club, second-most among U.S. clubs to Merion, with 18. The three previous U.S. Opens conducted at the club – all of which were decided in 18-hole playoffs – were in 1913 (won by Ouimet), 1963 (won by Julius Boros) and 1988 (won by Curtis Strange).

Other USGA championships played at the club include five U.S. Amateurs (1910, 1922, 1934, 1957 and 1982), as well as the 1902, 1941 and 1995 U.S. Women’s Amateurs, the 1932 and 1973 Walker Cup Matches, the 1953 U.S. Girls’ Junior and the 1968 U.S. Junior Amateur. It also hosted the 1999 Ryder Cup, won by the USA in a rousing final-day rally capped by Justin Leonard’s clinching putt.

“The Country Club has a long-standing, valued partnership with the United States Golf Association, so our membership is very excited and proud to have been chosen as the host site of the 2022 U.S. Open,” said Will Fulton, The Country Club’s general chairman for the 2022 U.S. Open. “We have been fortunate to have held 16 USGA events and to have witnessed some of golf’s great moments. Along with our gracious co-hosts, the Town of Brookline, we look forward to welcoming golf fans from New England and around the world.”

The 2023 U.S. Open will be held June 15-18, and Los Angeles Country Club will become just the third U.S. Open venue in Southern California, joining Riviera Country Club in nearby Pacific Palisades (1948) and Torrey Pines Golf Course in San Diego (2008, 2021).

“This George Thomas-designed gem, the North Course at Los Angeles Country Club, was recently restored by Gil Hanse, architect of the 2016 Olympic golf course in Rio de Janeiro,” said O’Toole. “It’s a perfect opportunity to take the U.S. Open to Los Angeles.”

The 2023 U.S. Open will be the fourth USGA championship at the club, which hosted the 1930 U.S. Women’s Amateur (won by six-time champion Glenna Collett Vare over three-time winner Virginia Van Wie) and the 1954 U.S. Junior Amateur (won by Foster Bradley Jr. over Al Geiberger). It will also host the 2017 Walker Cup Match, which is scheduled for Sept. 9-10.

“The city loves to host major events,” said John Chulick, club president. “This region, not having hosted the U.S. Open for 75 years, will be ecstatic about this.”

The 2024 U.S. Open, to be held June 13-16 on Pinehurst’s Course No. 2, will mark the fourth U.S. Open and 11th USGA championship at the historic venue. In addition to the unprecedented back-to-back U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open in June 2014, won by Martin Kaymer and Michelle Wie, the USGA has conducted these national championships at Pinehurst No. 2: the 1962 U.S. Amateur (won by Labron Harris Jr.); the 1989 U.S. Women’s Amateur (won by Vicki Goetze-Ackerman); the 1994 U.S. Senior Open (won by Simon Hobday); the 1999 U.S. Open (won by Payne Stewart); the 2005 U.S. Open (won by Michael Campbell) and the 2008 U.S. Amateur (won by Danny Lee).

“Pinehurst has elevated itself to one of the great and historic places in golf in this country,” said O’Toole. “Some say it’s our St. Andrews – it’s certainly something special, and that’s why we’re going back there for the 2024 U.S. Open.”

Prior to the 2024 U.S. Open, Pinehurst will host the 2017 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball Championship and the 2019 U.S. Amateur Championship.

“It is an honor and a privilege to be named as the site for the 2024 U.S. Open,” said Tom Pashley, Pinehurst Resort & Country Club president. “We take great pride in our relationship with the USGA and feel fortunate they have chosen to bring the national championship back to Pinehurst for the fourth time in just 25 years.”

FUTURE U.S. OPEN CHAMPIONSHIPS
DATES VENUE LOCATION
2016 (June 16-19) Oakmont Country Club Oakmont, Pa.
2017 (June 15-18) Erin Hills Erin, Wis.
2018 (June 14-17) Shinnecock Hills Golf Club Southampton, N.Y.
2019 (June 13-16) Pebble Beach Golf Links Pebble Beach, Calif.
2020 (June 18-21) Winged Foot Golf Club Mamaroneck, N.Y.
2021 (June 17-20) Torrey Pines Golf Course San Diego, Calif.
2022 (June 16-19) The Country Club Brookline, Mass.
2023 (June 15-18) Los Angeles Country Club Los Angeles, Calif.
2024 (June 13-16) Pinehurst Resort & Country Club Village of Pinehurst, N.C.
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